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. this is by the way his first visit to china either as president of the united states or as a private citizen. what the white house said is look if we are going to come to china, of course, we will come to beijing and have high level meetings there but we would also like to do an event in shanghai. it is undoubtedly the most western leaning of the cities in china. a go-go modern city. the commercial center of gravity throughout all of asia and the white house said we want to have something there a little less controlled and has a little less protocol and formality and have an event with some of the students in the overall shanghai region. the white house describes the students as the future leaders of china. the president wants to show them and the larger chinese community is that there can be give and take between the united states and china that is not so controlled. whether it is over human rights, economics, military strategy or a wide range of issues, global climate change would be another and that is one of the underlying motives for the white house in putting together the event, town hall, p
is the united states refining its anti-piracy strategy. the coast guard is bringing apprehended pirates to justice. how to fend off attacks. commander shannon gilrees, chief of prevention log group. commander, welcome to the show. >> thank you, sir. >> so how is the united states refining its anti-piracy campaign. >> we'll continue to adapt to what the pirates are throwing at us as far as their techniques. we are working with the maritime industry to try to answer their questions about how we can help them address the problems in the region. we're also working with interagency -- agency by that i mean the department of defense, department of state, the maritime administration, other agencies -- >> the justice department as well? >> the justice department as well. we're working to refine that policy to adapt the policies the pirates are using. >> prosecuting captured pirates has been a challenge. you can't drop them off in somalia for trial, for example. what is going on in that front in terms of cooperation the united states is striking with other country in the region to bring these gu
and india and the rest of east asia and these companies can be located in the united states, europe, japan. anywhere. you got to look at it company by company to try to latch on to some of this growth we're seeing coming out of asia. >> let me talk about the united states, the market has soared about 60% since march. really which was the bottom, of course. now hitting 13 month highs this week alone. do you think there's still room to go up? if i wanted to enter this market, put new capital to work right now is that worthwhile or have i missed. >> it's >> you haven't missed it at all. what people don't realize is how much the market pell in point terms and between october 9th of 2007 and march 9th of 2009 the s&p 500 fell by 888 points. we still regained less than half of those points lost. so there's still more money on the table than we've gotten back so far. so i know people would have liked to have gotten in hard. even if they didn't there's still opportunity for good gains in stocks in the united states over the next few years. >> what about the large sort of structural issues the u.s.
that the future of the united states and asia is inextricably linked. >> president obama is in asia threw next week with stops in tokyo, singapore, shanghai, beijing. so who get as the lion's share of obama's time? china. three days out of nine replicating what happened recently at the u.n. where the president of china and president obama were closeted for 90 minutes. this time allocation speaks for itself. and if there is any doubt remaining, obama's description of the u.s./chinese relationship clears it up. >> the relationship between the united states and china will shape the 21st century, which makes it as important bilateral relationship in the world. >> question. what must president obama accomplish in china this coming week? pat? >> he'll have to rebalance the trade relationship between the united states and china. the last ten years, the chinese have had a $2 trillion surplus. we've experted to them jobs, factories, money, technology, and that's one of the reasons why we've got this financial crisis and the dollar's in such trouble. what he's got to do is convince the chinese that this
with the united states both economic and security. the obama administration really doesn't want to revisit all of that, but president obama said on the record he understand that a new party coming to power will want to take a look at all the underlying agreements negotiated with the united states by the liberal democratic party. the big issues that will be on the table between these two leaders -- climate change, north korea, and trade. one other issue, of course, is afghanistan with the democratic party of japan came in, the prime minister decided to end a long-standing refueling operation the japanese were conducting with vessels in the indian ocean. but in exchange, the japanese government has put up funds in reconstruction aid. botin the main, this summit, the second time the two leaders have met is not going to produce any new u.s.-japanese announcement on any of the issues i discussed but it will be an opportunity for the two to discuss trade, north korea and climate change. steve: major, just a moment ago the white house office of the press secretary released something. apparently the u
and come to the united states and harm us physically or our nato allies or others. that's our quest. now can that quest be coupled with the ideas for nato -- schools, building a police force that is not corrupt, but also is efficient, and to do this in a country in which the literacy rate is so low, the poverty is so endemocratic. the whole traditions of dealing with money as to who your friends were is really so much a part of just existing. i think for the moment, the president from press accounts is looking at it province by province. he's looking at being in the medium-sized cities as well as the hamlets in the country. how does this match up with what we are doing with a line drawn by europeans a long time ago to divide the countries? do we understand the poshtoon culture? well, yes and no, and we're all learning fast, including the president, but i think we are learning. if the president does come forward with a plan or plans, he must make that very specific. and that is a very big quest. it will not do to have a tentative feeling that now you see if, now you don't, and this is amo
effect. a recent study by our national academy of sciences found that here in the united states burning fossil fuels leads to almost 120 billion dollars in health costs a year. most of those costs are premature deaths, and we know that the cost in human lives can be even higher in countries we merging economies that have fewer resources to improve air quality. for all of these reasons, president obama and i understand that we cannot wait any longer to act. president obama has made it clear that he's committed to passing comprehensive energy and climate legislation that will create millions of new jobs and secure clean energy sources that are made in america and work for america. but in the meantime, we're looking for ways that we can start reducing this threat right now. last friday i saw some of you at a white house stakeholder briefing i hosted with lisa jackson, the administrator of our environmental protection agency. at that briefing we talked about many of the steps my department is taking in this area from funding research on the health costs of greenhouse gas emissions to invest
service is enshrined in the constitution of the united states. we have a law that says the postal service should produce universal service. we have to maintain a basic service. host: joseph, independent caller. caller: one of the previous callers mentioned at the topic -- the vending machines. i look forward to going to the post office now with dread. one local post office has a giant hole in the wall covered with plywood where the vending machines used to be. when i asked one of the minister why they were gone. she said it was cost control. there's no way it can be more efficient to have all those people waiting in line. it makes no sense to me. there's something seriously wrong with the reasoning behind this kind of decision. i have seen it across the board. they're using space in the post offices for selling packages that have teddy bears and balloons on them. they should be sticking to basics, common-sense service. if i can avoid going to the post office, i will do it. they might as well -- it is just a nightmare. it is a baffling ordeal. guest: i am sorry to your use say that. you ar
industrial zone between egypt, israel and the united states. it has helped to boost our trade and export to the united states. but in the meantime, we are also working in new channels to support some initiatives between the two countries. and that's what i hope we can conclude in washington on monday. >> and what would you like to hear in order to walk away and feel that that was successful? >> well, we are still waiting to hear from the administration a stronger message about opening up in trade, not just with egypt, also with the rest of the world. i think that is a big question hanging at the moment in terms of the position of the administration, towards liberalization of trade. and i have to admit that this is a worry that we all have in emerging markets at the moment. but i feel confident because of the long history of the relationship between the two countries, that the support for a high level of economic cooperation between egypt and the united states will be materialized during this administration. >> well, it's true, i guess, in the economic slowdown, you know, countries across
to assume and they don't like having all the pressure brought on by the united states to ratchet up the level of chinese obligation. >> rose: also this evening, french chef eric ripert of the famous new york restaurant la bernadine. >> so when i came to new york, we're talking about 20 years ago. i came with a very french way of seeing food with a very strong mediterranean influence and then i discovered japanese cuisine. i discovered chinese cuisine, i went to brooklyn and visit the stores where they have all the spices. i traveled throughout the u.s. and interact with many other chefs from other cultures. i discovered south america. i went to japan. and all of that is ultimately digested and comes back in the kind of... i call that smart fusion. >> rose: a look at china and the united states in the after math of the presidential visit and food through the skills of eric ripert next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: this evening we continue our coverage of president obama's visit to china. earlier today he
asked you if the united states was being even-handed in dealing with israel's settlement policy, we got a very enthusiastic response from our viewers. many thought that the u.s. learned more towards israel. here's what one had to say. after following the after following the israel/palestine issue for many years, i am convinced that the u.s. policy favors israel. as to the constant mantra by the pro-israel crowd in the united states that insists that the palestinians recognize israel's right to exist, i think the palestinians are recognizing israel's right to exist when they agreed to consider a two-state solution. but another viewer said, "the u.s. has become one of the biggest appeasers of the arab world. it has recently placed tremendous pressure on israel, while ignoring 60 years of arab military and political action to destroy a tiny jewish state." >>> some other global news you might not have heard about. from tanzani a team of scientists predicts that climate change will make the snow on the top of mt. kilimanjaro, the continent's highest peak, disappear within 20 years. they say
conference with president obama. let's listen in. >> the deep bonds between the people of the united states and india and a historic opportunity we have to strengthen the partnership between our nations. india today is a rising and responsible global power. in asia, indian leadership is expanding prosperity and security across the region. and the united states welcomes and encourages india's leadership role in helping to shape the rise of a stable, peaceful and prosperous asia. beyond asia, the world's largest multiethnic democracy is one of the world's fastest growing economies and as a member of the g-2 o india will play a pivotal role in meeting the major challenges we face today. and this includes my top economic priority, creating good jobs with good wages for the the american people. so i believe the relationship between the united states and india will be one of the defining partnerships of the 21st century. and this visit underscores the strengthening of that partnership, which i hope will continue throughout my presidency. that's why i have made it a priority to broaden the coopera
in dealing with the united states. prime minist yukio hatoyoma s kept that prise, making i clearhat japan will no lo ar how itself t be treated as a rubber stamp for u.s. policy, especily on the issuef american milary bases. has gtten wasngton's tention, and itsrespect. and by today, relations seemed to be warming, ce again. in night's "lead focus" the presidensanalysis of u.s./japanese relation. president obama arrived in tokyo, t first stop on a four-nation tour that include siapore, china, south korea. shortly after hi arrival, esident obama met with e japanese primminister, yukio hatoyoma. among the issues on thetable, o afghanistan, north korea and global warming. in theiralks obama d the prime minister addressed bigges sore spot in u.s./japan relations the pressness of an air base in okinawa. ny are demanding the base be closed with protests taking place before the presidens arrival. both countriewould meet to address japan's concern about the base. >> our goal remains the same, and that's torovide for the defee of ja. with minimal intsion on the lives the people w share the pa. >
, it was six world powers that made a move today. delegates from the united states, britain, france, germany, russia and china met in brussels, belgium, and turned up the heat on iran. they didn't discuss the sanctions, not yet anyway, but that possibility served as a backdrop for today's meetings. the issue is iran's nuclear ambitions. tehran says its uranium enrichment program is for peaceful purposes only, but other countries worry it gives iran the capability of making an atomic bomb. despite some optimism in recent weeks, iran now seems to be rejecting a plan to have its uranium enriched outside the country. the delegates in brussels urged iran to reconsider, and hence the talk by president obama and others this week about the possibility of new sanctions. what kind of measures and when, that is our "lead focus" tonight. weeks after iran disclosed the existence of this once-secret nuclear facility near the holy city of qom, in brussels today representatives of the world's major powers pressed iran to accept a plan to curb its nuclear ambitions. the six countries released this statement
hopelessly deadlocked, can a new jewish lobby here in the united states shake up the status quo in washington, put its stamp on u.s. policy and rival apac? jeremy ben-ami sits down with me for a face-to-face debate on u.s.-israel policy with a member of the old guard. we begin with jay street. take a look at who addressed its opening national conference. >> mr. ben-ami, friends, i'm delighted to have this chance to say a few words to you tonight. let me congratulate you all on this important gathering. your theme says it all. driving change, securing peace. for too long we have not driven change. the palestinian-israeli conflict goes on into a seventh decade. peace has not been secured. and neither side has security. >> king abdullah of jordan is one of america's key allies, and never before has an arab head of state addressed the national conference of a major jewish lobby. so is the balance of power about to shift? i sat down with jeremy ben-ami, executive director of j street and david harris, the executive director of the ajc, american jewish committee. we did invited aipac to participate
it from europe, you see it from the united states and you see it from asia. tell me what you see. >> well, i see a very different situation. in europe there is no recovery and i think 2010's going to be a mediocre year in europe. same thing in japan. we don't see any recovery. we see resistance to the decline but no recovery. in the united states, things look more promising for the short term. you know, after a very large chop in the economy and particularly in the automobile industry. >> rose: but generally those impressions you just said are about the economy overall. >> yeah, but the economy overall we see slight growth in 2010. but a situation very different from one country to the other. >> rose: at what point in an economic recovery do consumers think about automobiles? >> well, you know, it depends where the consumer is. if he's in china or in brazil or india, he's thinking all the time about automobiles. what's the best opportunity? what's the best deal? and we're seeing these sales booming all the time. you know, no matter what. now, in that time, you have an increase of 5% or 10
the united states and india have not always been one. during the cold war, many saw india as unfriendly, which it might have been. during -- at the end of the cold war, there were opportunities to securitized. in the past several years, there has been a lifting of sanctions culminating in the historic civil nuclear accord. now, there@@@@@@h@ @ @ @ @ @ @ r strategic partnership. there is a need for wide ranging consultation to in grain habits of consultation -- to ingrain minister for being here. i want to welcome his entire delegation, including his most able ambassador and want to thank the gentleman standing here, lee hamilton, who is president and director of the woodrow wilson international center. i could not be more pleased to introduce the prime minister. lee hamilton resented the ninth district in the u.s. house of representatives and he is a model of what a legislator of to be. -- ought to be. congressman hamilton? [applause] >> good evening to you all and thank you for coming. i told the prime minister a moment ago that he was appearing before an extraordinary washington audie
is it when a united states citizen is declared disabled they have to wait time before they can get medicaid or medicare? host: 8 collar like that, better worse off? -- a caller like that. . guest: there are obviously community health clinics and other medical facilities that provide medical care cheaply or, in the cases of need, for free. i'm not minimizing the collar's husband's typical. i am sure -- caller's husband's difficulty. but there is health care available in the country for people who cannot afford to pay. ad. caller: good morning, michigan. host: michigan. i'm sorry. caller: i just wanted to say the last time i checked, unemployment was 19.5%, and my husband, who just had his 29th anniversary at the company he worked at has been laid off and is losing his mind. i would be crying if i thought it would do any good, but it will not. he is doing everything he can to find a job. as soon as he sees something in the newspaper, he goes there. he is so talented, he can fix anything, but he is 65 years old, too, and that is a problem. a few weeks ago, senator lugar? he was on "newsmakers"
but there is no question that commercial property in the united states is in bad shape it is going down. and there is a lot of genuine worries about that. dubai as a symbol might focus more attention next week but i think dubai is postly about emerging markets. our home problems are very much about the united states and they are very big and they are much bigger, actually, than the problems in dubai. >> warner: so the u.s. problems you think are a lot bigger. >> the total losses from the crisis so far worldwide which mostly concentrate on the united states $1.7 trillion. we're talking about credit losses in dubai of perhaps $20 billion. so that an order of magnitude, two orders of magnitude smaller in dubai than what we have seen in the united states. the additional problems in the united states are another 100, 200, 300 billion but they are coming on top of all these existing problems. they are coming into a banking system that is weak already in the united states. >> warner: so briefly do we have reason to be nervous by what happened today in dubai. >> yes, it should make us nervous. came at an ago waurd
hnology is more important than ever in driving the united states economy and also 33 percent saying united states will be the global tech leader and a lot of americans think we will not. why is that? >> there's good reason to be concerned. it's not so much that america's innovation pro west is lagging but that the rest of the world is catching us. the recession has not helped with unemployment at ten percent we have good minds not contributing to the economy and we've seen anybody incorporate america has seen a lot of projects and r and d spending cut back as companies try to trim costs as their top line as shrunk so the survey captures the notion that both in the long-term and short-term there's things to be concerned about. > the first paragraph of the story says by most measures, america remains the world leader in technology achievement. consider the 2009 nobel prize winners of the 13 people honored nine were america's. not bad, right? >> but the nobel is a lagging indicator that people earn that typically at the end of their career for work that took place in many cases years and years pri
government is going get by most of the west. not just the united states, but the cadians and the europea. ey're all getting ver disillusioned. th're spilling blood and spending a whole lot o money on a government at isn't sn legitimate by it own people. i think this patience is wearing thin across e boa. >> all right. thank you very muc foroining us. >> tha you. >>> a seni israeli military offici has warned of a new threat from hamas milints in gaza. the head of military intelligen, major general amos yadlin, sa today hamas has test-fired an iranian roet in recent days capable of fing 37 miles from gaza to tel av, israel's major metropolin area. until no rockets fired out of gaza have only reached uto 25 miles. he also said hamas is cuently not interested in confroation with israel, but rather devoting i energies to e continuingo smuggle gaza weons into the area. anon that rocket disclosure, we want to know at you think. our question tonig, how do you think israel shoulrespond to the latest sclosure that hamas has a missile capable of hiing tel-aviv? you n give us your opinion by going to th
that there are 200 million jews and the world and israel is half the size of europe. it is not. the united states and canada are roughly 400 times each the size of israel. the arab world is 500 times the size of israel. egypt alone is roughly the 40 times the size of israel. and even a small country like jordan, our neighbor to the east, is almost four times as big. israel is bigger than rhode island. [laughter] that is about it. [laughter] now, mind you, small countries are not necessarily insecure. belgium and luxembourg are small, but today they are not insecure. if their neighbors included radical regimes bent on their conquest, bent on their destruction, it they fell the -- if they feel that terror proxy's that fire thousands of missiles on their population, believe me, they too would feel insecure. anybody would. because of our small size and the radical and violent neighborhood in which we live, israel faces security threats like that of no other nation. here are two facts from recent days alone that will drive this point home. a few days ago, the israeli navy it predicted that the ship ca
the united states and india can strengthen the global economic recovery, promote trade that creates jobs for both our people and pursue growth that is balanced and sustained. as nuclear powers we can be full partners in preventing the spread of the world's most deadly weapons, securing loose nuclear materials from terrorists, and pursuing our shared vision of a world without nuclear weapons. >> india and america are separated by distance but bound together by the values of democracy, rule of law and respect for fundamental human freedoms. >> reporter: there's also some hard cash involved in this. american businesses are looking at india and seeing dollar signs because as you look at their infrastructure rebuilding, ports, airports, roads, etc., the chamber of commerce predicts they could over the next five years, u.s. companies could make $500 billion. this is also a good deal. >> what do both sides get out of this state visit? >> reporter: i think the united states gives india what it wants which is recognition that it is a very important country in the world right now, that in spite of
into office on a promise of change. including asserting greater independence in dealing with the united states. prime minister yukio hatoyoma has kept that promise, making it clear that japan will no longer allow itself to be treated as a rubber stamp for u.s. policy, especially on the issue of american military bases. he has gotten washington's attention, and its respect. and by today, relations seemed to be warming once again. in tonight's "lead focus" the president's analysis of u.s./japanese relation. president obama arrived in japan friday afternoon, tokyo time, the first stop on a four-nation tour that will include singapore, china and south korea. shortly after his arrival, president obama met with the japanese prime minister, yukio hatoyoma. among the issues on the table, afghanistan, north korea and global warming. in their talks, obama and the prime minister addressed biggest sore spot in u.s./japan relations -- the presence of an air base on okinawa. many japanese are demanding that the base be closed, with protests takin place prior to obama's visit. after today's talks the two lea
as a citizen of the united states is just appalling. i think eric holder should have left them in guantanamo bay and be tried there. i lived in new york in 2000 and 2001. it was just terrible. for them to be tried in a federal court, it just speaks to this country to give people that do not ware uniforms, do not apply to the geneva convention to come to our country and then be given rights like a citizen. host: david, in this newspaper article, attorney general holder elected to proceed with the first u.s. criminal prosecution alleged to have been directly involved in the plot eight years ago that targeted the world trade center and pent he gone because of his full confidence in the successful outcome. tell us why you are not as convinced of the outcome? caller: i'm not confident because i believe that in our country, people are innocent until proven guilty. when you use water boarding and all these things they are trying to use against ournqq governmen why should a terrorist be given rights in our country. host: let's go to the democratic line. caller: i think they should be tried here. t
, opening up new opportunities for u.s. workers here in the united states of america which is exactly what is being said to president obama as he meets in korea at this moment with their leadership. with president lee and others. so i think that we need to have our attention in this congress focused on the priorities -- the priorities the american people have. fire fighting is very, very important. but again this measure will pass if not unanimously narrowly unanimously and it will do so and i hope get the resources to ensure that we never have the loss of life like those of captain hall and others. but i know from having spoken to their families, mr. speaker, that they believe that the absolutely essential for us to encourage private sector job creation and economic growth and that's why i'm talking about this priority that needs to be addressed here. now, mr. speaker, i'm going to urge my colleagues to defeat the previous question as we move ahead. why? because the issue of reading legislation is another very, very important one that is before us. there is a bipartisan proposal launched
to become more democratic, and in that way, not one has chosen to adopt the united states system, and we should ask why. because it does not provide the same kind of representation. i do believe we should have proportional representation and if we don't get there yet, joyce surmising voting systems or combination thereof because for example how many saab the front page of "the new york times" where they talked about new york city had a runoff election and in a city of almost 8 million people almost nobody showed up to vote. 3 million registered democrats than you had some districts were actually nobody came to vote. we can do better than this, so maybe, and i would start i believe we should start looking at things like the electoral college which are anachronistic now and i know those might be fighting wars here but i would be happy to engage in think about how we want to improve our system. our system was great maybe for the 18th century but were now in the 21st century and there have been kinds of systems the pies that can be applied they can do things, make the electoral system more r
to fulfil its obligations and eliminate its nuclear weapons program, the united states will support economic assistance and help promote its full integration in the community of nations. that opportunity and respect will not come with threats. north korea must live up to its obligations. >> reporter: that statement echoed president lee's offer of a "grand bargain"-- aid for the communist north in return for giving up nuclear weapons. >> the north koreans haven't yet conveyed what they thought of the grand bargain, but in order for the north koreans to ensure their stability, to improve the lives of the north korean population, to have economic prosperity, in short: for a better future for the north koreans, it is my wish that the north koreans adopt the grand bargain proposal. >> reporter: the offer came just a week after north and south korean ships exchanged fire near a disputed border in the yellow sea. neither president mentioned the sea clash today. instead, mr. obama announced he'll send an envoy to north korea next month-- the first direct talks between washington and pyongyang since
portfolios over the largest bank holding companies of the united states accounting for about 2/3 of all the assets of the banking system. we were able to look across banks and examiners and asset classes and combined our usual examination procedures with off sight surveillance done by economists using a wide range of statistical methods. i think we learned a largement in that exercise -- large amount in that exercise. the confidence in the banking sector rose significantly but we also learned great deal about how to examine banks in a comprehensive way across the entire system. . i think, henry, i think going forward what we really need to know will be how to examine the system as a whole. i think one of the failures of regulatory oversight during the crisis was our -- when i talk about regulators in general, how individual firms and how each individual firm is doing. one of the things we've learned and very challenging for us as we go forward will be that we need to look at the whole system. we need to see how the markets have interact with each other. have interact with each other. we
ago, this image would have been unimaginable. the president of the united states in the same room at the same time as a member of the burmese military government. a sign the new policy of engagement with the region in general. an opportunity for barack obama to call for the release ofhe democracy leader in burmese. that demand was not reflected in the initial statement of the meeting. >> during our meeting we talked about how, we can work together as close partners both within this region and throughout the world. we discussed the importance of meeting, and challenges like climate change, nuclear proliferation, and working to support the g-20 efforts to promote a balance for the economic recovery. >> president obama went to singapore late and is making up for lost time. had a meeting with his russian counterparts. the main reason for him being here was a summit with asia- pacific leaders. boosting free trade was a purpose. a pessimistic message oa new day of climate change played to the headlines. >> the go binding treaty signing may not happen. pressed a bold statement from a gro
and during her address, which she is delivering right now on the floor of the united states senate, senator lincoln says that it's time to begin the debate and it's not time to walk away. she says she is not afraid of the debate over health care reform. she says she is against the so-called public option, the government-run option that is the center piece of the piece of legislation that is currently on the floor of the senate, even though she's against that piece of the legislation, she says, it will not stop her from voting wre, yes, along with the rest of her democratic colleagues in helping to move this process one step forward. this is not a vote on the actual health care reform bill itself, but rather, a procedural vote that's an important step in the process, it allows the senate a majority leader reid to bring this to debate. with the yes vote of senator lincoln from arkansas, the 60 vote threshold has been reached. and the vote will be taken at eight o'clock eastern time and for now, senator reid can listen to the remainder of his colleagues speak as they have been doing all after
to understand the future of the united states and asia is inextricably linked, the matters that matter most to our people, nonproliferation, clean energy. these are all issues that have to be part of a joint agenda, and we had a productive discussion about these issues this evening. >> for both countries, ties are critical. japan relies on the u.s. for its security. the you best allies -- the u.s. relies on japan as an ally in an unpredictable area. around this time of year the japanese by could blunt terms. they have been doing these things for centuries. people said it is time for a new relationship with the united states. >> we are gaining maturity and we need more people standing, ying,รง yes, america is not the way. >> i think president obama himself knows we need to respect each other. >> this brief visit is unlikely to resolve the issues between the two countries, including the relocation of a base in okinawa, but president obama is showing that the u.s. still the the use its relationship. >> report from washington over the past few of hours say khalid sheikh mohammed and four other
already slated to come to the united states. in fact, to come here to new york city because they are going to stand trial for the 9/11 attacks. among them, the self-proclaimed master mind, khalid shaikh mohammed. as you can imagine there are strong opinions whether his trial in civilian court works to his advantage. >> what we're kind of granting his wish. his wish was to be brought to new york and really makes no sense to me to be granting him his wish. he should be tried in a military tribunal. he is a war criminal. this was an act of war. >> the sheik, mohammed, wants to be considered a holy warrior, a jihadist, if we try him before military offices that image of a soldier will be portrayed by the islamic community. that's not the image we want. >> julie: we have the fox news team coverage of the latest developments. live in chicago, but first let's get to julie kirtz live in washington. so, julie, what are guiliani's main objections to the trials being held here in new york? >> yeah, he was pretty outraged. made a couple of points on fox news sunday. conducting trial in fork city will
-paying jobs in the united states. export promotion would be something we could do without spending money. there may be tax provisions that may encouraging highering sooner are remember than than later, so we're looking at those. it is important to wreck r. recognize that if we keep on adding to the debt, even in the midst of this recovery, that a at some point people could lose confidence in the u.s. economy in a way that could lead to a double-dip recession, so one of the trickiest things that we're doing right now is to, on the one hand, make sure that the recovery is supported, and not withdraw a lot of money either with tax increases or big spending cuts and states, for example, need a lot of support to keep hiring teachers and so forth, and at the same time making sure we're setting up a pathway long term for the reduction. it is about as hard of a play as there is, but it's what we have to do, and whatever jobs, additional jobs legislation comes out with has to fit into that broader framework. >> does it raise the deficit or not? >> we haven't seen that and that's part of the reaso
for president. >> well, here is the big question. do you ever want to be president of the united states? >> that certainly isn't on my radar screen right now. but when you consider some of the ordinary turning into extraordinary events that have happened in my life, i am not one to predict what will happen in a few years. my ambition, if you will, my desire, is to help our country in whatever role that may be. and i cannot predict what that will be, what doors would be opened in the year 2012. >> we were talking, she used the word ambition. if she had said my ambition -- my passion or commitment it would have had a different reaction to people and they pay attention to that. sean: you're really good at what you do. you advise politicians and advise a lot of people in the public arena how to deal with the media. but maybe if she -- one of the things she talks about in the campaign is she couldn't be sarah. if she would have listened to you, and become the little contrived -- does she become a little canned, does she become a little -- >> she became contrived and canned because of what wa
trafficking is actually done out of the prison system in the united states. particularly the california prison system. and he mentioned one prison, pelican bay, in specific. and then i came back, and i found that there are all these cell phones in prisons which enables a group, name live the mexican mafia, to essentially use cell phones to give directives right out of prisons on hits, on territories, on dealers, and i think this is a very serious thing. i've introduced legislation that would make cell phones contraband in federal prisons with possession punishable by up to an additional year in prison. what do you think of this? what are you doing? it is a real problem, mr. attorney general. >> it is a real problem, senator. i had experience with that when i was the united states attorney here in washington, d.c. rapel edmonds was convicted, sent to jail and continued to run his drug enterprise from prison, was convicted again for that. the maintenance of cell phones in prison, i think, is unacceptable and i think we have to find ways in which we conif i skate them. you're right, they ought to
of open candid conversations that lead to decisions being made that will benefit the united states and move us toward goals like more peaceful prosperous outcomes for us and many parts of the world. secondly, i think it is important to underscore that we see the fight against al qaeda and the syndicate of terror in the security interest of the united states. i think that kind of got lost the last eight years with a lot of talk about how it wasn't important to get bin laden, you know, that we were there for some other reason. no. it's critical to get those who attacked us. that is what we are there for and what we are trying to do is to assess the best way forward so that we can go anywhere in the united states and anywhere in the world and say the same thing. you have to understand that we believe this syndicate of terror is a threat, not just to the united states and our friends and allies, but to pakistan, afghanistan and many others. >> let me turn to the issue of china where you and the president head next. the lead of the new york times story out this morning about the preside
. >>> plus, is the united states still a superpower? the president came back from his trip to asia pretty much empty handed. we're fighting two wars, our economy is in tatters. has the sun set on the american empire. >> for the last 20 years the united states has had no rivals. we now have serious competitors. >>> should religion be used as a political weapon? patrick kennedy says he's been told not to take communion because of his support for abortion rights. >> he said the fact that i don't agree with all the teachings of the church doesn't make me less of a catholic. well, in fact it >> should this be part of politics. >>> and a story that seems like science fiction but it's all true. doctors discover a man who seemed to be in a coma for 23 years actually heard every word they said. the amazing true story of what he calls his second birth. >>> this is your only source for news. cnn primetime begins now. here's campbell brown. >>> hi, everybody, we're going to start tonight as always with the "mash-up." we're watching it all so you don't have to. first, tonight, there is breaking news f
, organization for economic cooperation and development. the main headline -- united states, china, and asia pulling the world out from the economic war tax. it comprises 30 cents of the rich countries. it doubled its growth forecast for the group to.9%. in for diggs unemployment in the united states will start to fall as soon as the ecomy picks up. countries in asia, particularly china, underpinning the growth. in europe not so good. job losses expected to continue. oecd warns developed countries it will not be an easy ride. many factors can blow recovery of course, not the least bringing down budget deficit. for emerging nations -- 10% for china, 7% for india, and brazil and ruia are expected to do well, too. >> thank you. see you soon. please stay with us. oming up -- with the future uncertain, guantanamo bay. see how the camp is changing. it is make your mind up time. europe's leaders gathered to find out who will be the union's first-ever president. >> the diaries of mussolini's lover has been published in italy. she wrote about her relationship with the italian dictator. it is called s
helped the hijackers reach the united states, then sent them $120 thousand dollars for expenses and flight training. the suspects have been held for as long as 5 years-- at secret sites and at guantanamo-- and have been subjected to harsh interrogations. khalid sheikh mohammed was reportedly water-boarded 183 times in 2003 before the practice was banned. but at today's news conference, attorney general holder said he was sure of convictions. >> the reality is-- and i want to be as assuring as i can-- that, based on all of my experience and based on all of the recommendations and the great work and the research that has been done, that i am quite confident that the outcomes in these cases will be successful ones. >> reporter: and in japan, president obama said he believes the u.s. federal courts are up to the job. >> i am absolutely convinced that khalid sheik mohammad will be subject to the most exacting demands of justice. the american people will insist on it and my administration will insist on it. >> reporter: the idea of bringing the detainees to the u.s. has already run in
that india's partnership with the united states is going to play an influential role in the 21st century. the two leaders discussed several pressing issues, including nuclear deals, climate change as well as the economy. >> mr. president, i bring to you and the people of the united states of america the friendly greetings of over 1 billion people of india. >> as leading economies, the united states and india can strengthen the global economic recovery, promote trade that creates jobs for both our people and pursue growth that is balanced and sustained. as nuclear powers, we can be full partners in preventing the spread of the world's most deadly weapons, securing loose nuclear materials from terrorists and pursuing our shared vision of a world without nuclear weapons. >> in less than three hours, the president and the first lady will host a state dinner for prime minister singh at the white house. now it's the obamas' first state dinner, and the question, of course, why was india's leader chosen for such an historic honor. our senior foreign affairs correspondent jill dougherty explains.
about his new autobiography, and his 20 years in the united states senate. this is live on c-span every day, at 7:00 eastern. the center for american progress will have a forum on the u.s. education system tomorrow morning, including remarks by the education secretary, arnie duncan, and new york mayor michael blumberg. this is 8:00 eastern. >> the yeas are 60, the nays are 39. the motion is agreed upon. >> with that, the senate is moving the health care bill to the floor. starting on monday and through december, follow every minute of debate, and see how this would affect access to health care, abortion, and medicare, on the only network that gives you the senate, -- 2-gavel, c-span2. >> -- gavel to gavel, c-span2. >> the president and his wife hosted the indian prime minister. we have our coverage behind the scenes. >> this is the first state dinner of the obama administration, and the third for thindia in one decade. these are being held behind me and we are joined by nia-maleka henderson. who are some of the notable people tonight? >> oprah winfrey was not here tonight, but her best
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